What should I do if I want to analyse my sample using a cuvette test, but the sample is coloured or turbid?

Document ID

Document ID TE8577

Published Date

Published Date 18/09/2019
Question
What should I do if I want to analyse my sample using a cuvette test, but the sample is coloured or turbid?
Answer
Turbidity and colouration can result in erroneous findings from photometric analysis. The interfering factors may originate either from the sample itself or from reactions with the reagents. The impact of the turbidity and/or colouration can be determined by calculating the sample-specific blank value.

The work instructions for the relevant cuvette test must be followed precisely to determine a sample-specific blank value. The reaction time and temperature specifications of the relevant cuvette test must also be observed. However, when using the blank value approach, one or more components are replaced within a work process, as listed in the attached case report for the individual cuvette tests.

Case report: sample-specific blank value